Latest publications


Title Summary Date
The drinking water service and users' perceptions of the state in Rolpa, Nepal
Suman Babu Paudel, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Gopikesh Acharya, Annal Tandukar and Paul Harvey
Over 96% of Nepalese households can still not access drinking water at home. In this paper, the authors examine what effect this has on users’ views of the government 02/09/2015
Could do better: Education in Nepal and users’ perceptions of the state
Annal Tandukar, Suman Babu Paudel, Gopikesh Acharya
Despite significant investment by the government, quality education still seems to rely on individual leadership. Why? 25/08/2015
Taking the temperature: Health services in Nepal and users’ perceptions of the state
Suman Babu Paudel, Gopikesh Acharya, Annal Tandukar
Going to a no-fee government district hospital in Nepal can be more expensive than visiting a private clinic. Why? 25/08/2015
Thirsty for change: Water services in Nepal and users’ perceptions of the state
Gopikesh Acharya, Suman Babu Paudel, Annal Tandukar
Three quarters of all Nepalese households still have no sanitation. Why? 25/08/2015
Education services and users’ perceptions of the state in Rolpa, Nepal
Annal Tandukar, Sony KC, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Suman Babu Paudel, Gopikesh Acharya and Paul Harvey
Significant progress has been made in rebuilding Nepal's education services post-conflict, but the government’s role in this is not widely understood. In this paper, the authors examine why 25/08/2015
Health services and users’ perceptions of the state in Rolpa, Nepal
Suman Babu Paudel, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Gopikesh Acharya, Annal Tandukar and Paul Harvey
Free medicines and basic health services have failed to improve the view of the government in Nepal. In this paper, the authors examine why 25/08/2015
After Ebola: towards a smarter model of capacity building
Richard Mallett and Lisa Denney
This briefing paper relates to the report, After Ebola: why and how capacity support to Sierra Leone’s health sector needs to change. The central argument of this briefing paper is that capacity building in the country’s health sector has been thought about and operationalised in a narrow, technical way. This dominant approach has ignored both the relational and systemic dimensions of capacity. A smarter model of capacity building is needed – one that does justice to the challenge of health systems strengthening, and to citizens seeking quality healthcare. To that end, five ideas and several recommendations are proposed. 02/07/2015
After Ebola: why and how capacity support to Sierra Leone’s health sector needs to change
Lisa Denney and Richard Mallett with Ramatu Jalloh
The Ebola crisis revealed not only weaknesses in Sierra Leone’s health system, but also the limits of international capacity support over the last 13 years. The central argument of this report is that capacity building in the country’s health sector has been thought about and operationalised in a narrow, technical way. This dominant approach has ignored both the relational and systemic dimensions of capacity. A smarter model of capacity building is needed – one that does justice to the challenge of health systems strengthening, and to citizens seeking quality healthcare. To that end, five ideas and several recommendations are proposed. 01/07/2015
The role of social protection in state legitimacy in the former conflict areas of Sri Lanka
Nayana Godamunne
Taking a bottom-up approach, the paper examines men and women’s everyday encounters with the state bureaucracy in Sri Lanka and how these encounters affected their perceptions of the state. The paper focuses on the areas affected by the war, where the state continued to provide basic services, even during the height of the fighting. The paper argues that while social protection plays an important role in building state-society relations through the engagement of citizens with state officials, state legitimacy is the effect of a highly complex process. 01/07/2015
Politics and governance in Afghanistan: The case of Kandahar
Ashley Jackson
This paper examines subnational governance and access to public goods in Kandahar, Afghanistan. In Kandahar relationship-based networks regulate nearly every aspect of political and social order, including access to justice, employment and participation in the economy. The paper seeks to understand the power relations at play, attempting to separate how government functions in reality from narratives created by the international community about how government should function. This paper is the second in a series of case studies undertaken by the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU) and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). 22/06/2015

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