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The Nepal research programme

It is now eight years since the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement brought an official end to a decade-long conflict (the ‘People’s War’) between the Nepalese state and Maoist insurgents. Yet peace remains fragile and the construction of a state able to effectively deliver services to its citizens is very much a work in progress. International aid actors’ engagement in Nepal is largely premised around support to state- and peace-building processes, with the 2010–2015 Nepal Peace and Development Strategy developed by donor agencies (including DFID, USAID, the EU and UN agencies) making explicit connections between effective service delivery and state-building. However, little is known about how people have been accessing services and interacting with local-level governance structures in the post-conflict period, which leaves the central premise of donor engagement in Nepal on shaky foundations. Furthermore, the limited evidence we have suggests some significant challenges persist, including: the presence of local political vacuums stemming from an absence of elected local government; weak government and aid interventions in remote rural areas; and uneven inclusion of various conflict-affected groups in formal social protection programmes.

The Nepal research programme seeks to generate usable evidence on livelihoods, service delivery and social protection that will help inform better modes of international engagement in Nepal. The programme is driven by two central research themes, outlined below, and focused geographically on Rolpa and Bardiya – two of the most conflict-affected remote areas in the mid-western hills and Terai – as well as Ilam, a relatively accessible district in the far eastern hills.

The Nepal Research Programme will focus on the following themes:

  1. State-society relations in ‘New’ Nepal: What determines people’s views of the state and how do perceptions affect legitimacy?
  2. Rules of engagement: What can international actors do to improve post-conflict capacity development in Nepal?

More information

 

The team

Our SLRC Nepal Research Programme is being led by the National Center for Contemporary in Research (NCCR) based in Kathmandu, Nepal.

Contact us

Dr. Bishnu Raj Upreti
Nepal Center for Contemporary Research
Ekantakuna, Jawalakhel
GPO Box: 910
Kathmandu
, Nepal
Tel. + 00977 1 555 47 56, 500 00 5
Website: http://www.nccr.org.np/
Email: slrc@odi.org.uk
Follow @NCCRSouthAsia

 
Title Author Summary Country Date
The Drinking Water and Sanitation Programme of Nepal's Local Governance and Community Development Programme Gopikesh Acharya, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Suman Babu Paudel, Annal Tandukar and Daniel Harris Local Governance and Community Development Programme (LGCDP) interventions were introduced in Nepal after the Maoist insurgency to improve basic drinking water and sanitation service delivery and local governance and state-society relations. But what effect have they really had? Nepal 23/06/2016
The Effectiveness of Local Peace Committees in Nepal: A study from Bardiya district Annal Tandukar, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Suman Babu Paudel, Gopikesh Acharya, Daniel Harris Local Peace Committees were set up in Nepal to help support peacebuilding initiatives at the local level. But have they really made any difference? Nepal 03/06/2016
Taxation, livelihoods, governance: evidence from Nepal Richard Mallett, Gopikesh Acharya, Georgina Sturge Tax more, but also tax better: that is the central message of this report on taxation in Nepal, where formal taxes appear to be at an all-time low. Nepal 29/01/2016
The drinking water service and users' perceptions of the state in Rolpa, Nepal Gopikesh Acharya, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Suman Babu Paudel, Annal Tandukar and Paul Harvey Over 96% of Nepalese households can still not access drinking water at home. In this paper, the authors examine what effect this has on users’ views of the government Nepal 02/09/2015
Could do better: Education in Nepal and users’ perceptions of the state Annal Tandukar, Suman Babu Paudel, Gopikesh Acharya Despite significant investment by the government, quality education still seems to rely on individual leadership. Why? Nepal 25/08/2015
Taking the temperature: Health services in Nepal and users’ perceptions of the state Suman Babu Paudel, Gopikesh Acharya, Annal Tandukar Going to a no-fee government district hospital in Nepal can be more expensive than visiting a private clinic. Why? Nepal 25/08/2015
Thirsty for change: Water services in Nepal and users’ perceptions of the state Gopikesh Acharya, Suman Babu Paudel, Annal Tandukar Three quarters of all Nepalese households still have no sanitation. Why? Nepal 25/08/2015
Education services and users’ perceptions of the state in Rolpa, Nepal Annal Tandukar, Sony KC, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Suman Babu Paudel, Gopikesh Acharya and Paul Harvey Significant progress has been made in rebuilding Nepal's education services post-conflict, but the government’s role in this is not widely understood. In this paper, the authors examine why Nepal 25/08/2015
Health services and users’ perceptions of the state in Rolpa, Nepal Suman Babu Paudel, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Gopikesh Acharya, Annal Tandukar and Paul Harvey Free medicines and basic health services have failed to improve the view of the government in Nepal. In this paper, the authors examine why Nepal 25/08/2015
What does Nepal’s Old Age Allowance mean for the elderly? Evidence from Rolpa Sony KC, Bishnu Raj Upreti, Suman Babu Paudel, Gopikesh Acharya, Annal Tandukar and Babken Babajanian In Nepal, the Old Age Allowance is an essential lifeline for the elderly, but a series of constraints in its design and implementation are limiting its effectiveness in practice. This briefing paper looks at what should be done to further improve the programme. Nepal 31/10/2014